August 17th, 2016 by NerdBlurt

What was once VMTurbo is now turbonomic. The company has decided to shift focus away from the VM and focus more on the turbo in it’s name that is! I feel this is a great way to be agile like the customers are around you. Businesses today are not just focused on “VM” anymore there are more layers and technology coming into play. I am fortunate to be involved in blogger briefings from the company over the last few years.


turbonomicIt is all in a name right? Would Taco Bell be Taco Bell if its name was something different? I think if you take a look to back in the day when they use to ring a dinner bell and peoples love of tacos this was great brand strategy by Taco Bell. turbonomic took a slightly different approach but yet similar, by morphing “Turbo Speed, “automatic control” and “Economic Principles” and forming turbonomic. Not only did they incorporate what their customers are facing today, they implemented the concept and thinking of making the management of your environment as autonomic as your heart beat.

Understand that they do a little more then that, the green circle in the logo represents the green circle community. turbonomic has always been a great supporter of the community with it’s participation in vBlogs, bloggers, user groups and virtual design master, etc so to have a piece of that represented in the logo is awesome.


Nerd’s Blurt

This is a bold statement and great transition period for companies like turbonomic, to be established then try and shake things up can be rewarding but also have it’s troubles. I am hoping for the best for the turbonomic team while they start this new adventure. If you check their twitter stream you can see it has given some fun spirits to the employees. They are keeping the community, it’s users, employees excited. In my opinion that is what a company should want to do. While I hope they do not change the name again nor does this work for all companies, but turbonomic hit the nail on the head with this move in my book.

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HPE Verity
June 8th, 2016 by NerdBlurt

Last week Hewlett Packard Enterprise announced HPE Verity. Now I work for HPE in the business unit and am responsible for the social media. To me it is exciting to see the behind the scenes of what happens when you are launching a product or an update with new features, to be able to finally talk about something you have known about for months. Today is that day I get to talk to you about HPE Verity.

What is HPE VeHPE Verityrity?

HPE Verity is a next-generation, unified IM&G framework that provides a single source of truth

  • Information management & governance applications and services are integrated within a common framework.
  • Built on a SaaS architecture it can be deployed in virtually any geography to support data sovereignty requirements
  • With native, in-place analytics information is not moved from application to application but is available directly within Verity

HPE Verity’s set of applications and services will uniquely help organizations comprehensively manage, govern, and extract actionable insights from enterprise information.

So really what you are looking at is the start of what HPE is touting it’s Next-Gen Information and Governance framework, the stepping stone to many new products. Now working for the group I have insider knowledge and the greater vision but I like paying my bills so I will only talk about what I can when I can.

In a session during HPE Discover the company’s Semi-annual conference David Jones and Stephen Spellicy gave folks a closer look at HPE Verity. You can read a recap of that session here

Nerd’s Blurt

I am excited for for is to come! I will also be writing some more posts hopefully on here on some of the things I am learning about in the information governance space. I am going to stop here now as I want to write up a quick day one recap of HPE Discover from Las Vegas.

I would also like to note I wrote this on my own as HPE is my employer this is my blog and any writing on here is solely my own opinion or that of any guest writers.

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May 7th, 2015 by JFrappier

Jonathan Frappier Virtxpert

**Disclaimer: I am an EMC employee, this post was not sponsored or in any way required by my employer, it is my experience getting to know this particular product.**

There were two software related announcements at EMC World this week which I found very exciting. Building on the free for no production use of RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines from VMworld 2014, EMC announced the same for ScaleIO. ScaleIO allows you build your own Hyperconverged Infrastructure solution (HCI). This is the same software used in the new VxRack from VCE which was also announced at EMC World.

CoprHDIn addition to ScaleIO, EMC also announced CoprHD which is an open source version of EMC ViPR (@coprhd). ViPR (which is also free for non production use) is a solution that allows you to manage multiple arrays and present those as virtual volumes to hosts. In addition to managing the arrays, it also provides a self-service and automation at the storage layer. EMC ViPR also supports ScaleIO, assuming this carries over to CoprHD you could deploy a fully managed, and automated storage solution on commodity hardware for test/dev or QA (I hope they publish more specific guidelines on just what they mean by “non-production”).

Last, but not least, the community version of the VNXe which you can use to provide full block and file servers on commodity hardware. The vVNX will later come in a supported ROBO and cloud edition.

My hope is that CoprHD, ScaleIO, and the community edition of the vVNX will lead to more solutions being open sourced and offered in a free to use model. CoprHD should be available on GitHub by June, ScaleIO by the end of May, whereas the vVNX is available now for download.


New free software from EMC to build your own SDS solution

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February 23rd, 2015 by JFrappier

Jonathan Frappier Virtxpert

During the #vBrownBag DevOps series after-show from my Using Ansible to provision VM’s in vCenter, Mike Marseglia asked about options for linting Ansible playbooks. Since I didn’t know, I thought it would be worthwhile to look into it. There is an Ansible-Lint repo on GitHub, reading through the information, it seemed straight forward. Here I am going to have a look at installing and using it against some example playbooks.

Installation should be easy, assuming you’ve got the correct packages installed, see my previous Ansible posts – if you got through that install, you should be able to install this with a single line:

pip install ansible-lint

Once installed you should now be able to do something like this:

ansible-lint clone-vm.yml

The clone-vm.yml is from my #vBrownBag series. As you can see in this screenshot, it suggests I have some trailing whitespace

ansible-lint-whitespaceOnce I tiddy up the extra whitespace in the playbook, no suggestions are returned.

ansible-lint-fixedThat is a pretty basic example, let’s say I’ve missed something such as a { when using vars_prompt, here you can see I have a missing backet for vm


Once again, now that it is fixed, no suggestions are returned. One thing that at least this specific tool does not help with is spacing errors, so your playbook will need to be valid, running ansible-lint here for example where my spacing is incorrect results in an general Ansible error, though it does point out where the error likely is:


Going forward I’ll certainly be looking into using this when writing a playbook to ensure general recommended practices are adhereed to. I’m still on the lookout for a tool that can help with spacing though!

Ansible-lint for playbooks

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February 23rd, 2015 by JFrappier

Jonathan Frappier Virtxpert

I wanted to share some of the example Ansible playbooks used during last Wednesday’s US #vBrownBag. During the show I went over examples of how you can use Ansible to create, clone, and update virtual machines in vCenter without the need for other provisioning tools. Based on my testing (and I’m still learning as well), the items noted in the comments are the bare minimum needed to run the playbook, even though the official documentation may currently state otherwise. If you are already using Ansible for configuration management, this is a handy option to have as you can perform the provisioning tasks without leaving Ansible.

All playbooks have been uploaded to my GitHub Ansible-Test-Playbooks repository (https://github.com/jfrappier/ansible-test-playbooks/).

#vBrownBag Using Ansible with vCenter Examples

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